Friday, 22 February 2013

WordPress Daily Prompt: Seconds

Describe the most satisfying meal you have ever had, in glorious detail.

Eating Lamb and Couscous in a Bedouin tent

Satisfying meals are many and I really do not need a luxury restaurant or something special. Food is always satisfying if you are hungry, and there is no special dish to qualify. Our food in the Western world is always in plenty and if you cannot be bothered to cook it then there are enough fast food restaurants to sustain your hunger.  I have been cooking for the family for the past forty-six years. I am not a fussy eater, I will try everything. What comes on the table I eat. I am not vegetarian, nor vegan, have no dislikes in connection with religion. There are enough that starve in this world and would be glad of every left-over we throw away, or crumbs that fall on the floor, so food is something you eat to live and not the opposite.

However, there are always meals that stay in your mind as being good, tasty, a cut above the rest. I grew up with english home cooking. My mum could not cook, she cooked like her mother did, which explains all. Her motto was as long as a meal comes on the table, everything is well. Sometimes less would have been more, but I survived. I have no problem with food from other countries. I ate Asian food for two years, living with a Pakistani family. I generally eat European food, being in Switzerland and surrounded by Germany, France and Italy. I also like food from Eastern European countries. I am not fussy.

The interesting part is shown by the photo. I had the chance to spend a few days in Marrakesh, Morocco, through the company where my husband worked. This was a few years ago, but I enjoyed the visit very much. I had never set foot on the African continent, and Morocco was a country full of colours, sounds and sights I had never experienced, not to mention the aromas of the food. They had their own specialities and we were lucky enough on our stay to be able to experience the best of the best.

I am sure what we were served was not the every day food of the locals, but we were visitors and were treated and spoilt by the wonderful people of this country. One evening we were invited to the local casino, a meal accompanied with music. A Moroccan speciality was served, something called Bastilla, which is pigeon pie. One of the people in our group refused it as she said she does not eat the little birds. I found pigeon is not little so why not. To be honest it would not be something I would actually serve at home. The dish reminded me of some sort of grave. There was a lid of pastry and when I lifted it, below was a collection of small bones belonging to the unfortuante bird. The meat was ok, but did not actually stay in my memory as being unforgettable. If I remember rightly the pastry was on the sweeter side and had a sprinkling of icing sugar over it.

One evening we were invited to a bedouin tent. There were a few tents erected for the benefit of the tourists, such as we were. We sat at a round table.  The main course arrived at the table in the middle, it was a sheep. Not leg, or breast but a complete half a sheep had been roasted for our benefit. It was served with couscous and the whole main dish was placed in the middle of the table. Knives and forks were supplied, but we all decided when in Morocco do as the Moroccans do, so we dived in with hands and fingers (only the right hand of course, nations that eat with their fingers never use the left hand, that is reserved for something else). I very much like lamb and as this sheep seem to be quite small I decided it was lamb and not mutton. I remember it being very tender and tasty and I enjoyed it very much. Wine was served with the meal, the Moroccans have quite good wine it seems, although I did not try it as I do not drink alcohol. I am also sure that the Moroccan people generally also do not drink wine, but it is exported and a source of finance.

Of course to complete this typical Moroccan meal, it was accompanied by dancing and singing ladies in the Moroccan way of music. It was an evening not to be forgotten.

Me dancing with Marrocan Ladies in a Bedouin tent

That is me second from left. The journey took place in 1990 so I was somewhat younger and still had a figure (43 years old). I could even sway to the rhythm and dance. I think today I would have stayed in my chair and just enjoyed watching. 


  1. I am very much like you, I will try just about any kind of food, at least once. I can think of very few foods that I won't eat (the main exception being celery....the mere smell of it makes me feel sick!!). I love to try foods from around the world. And by something of a coincidence, I also experienced Moroccan food in Marrakesh, way back in 1983, before it became a destination for the package-holiday tourists. I didn't try Bastilla (it was never on the menu) but the 'side of lamb' with couscous was something I did experience. I was about to ask who the woman in the last photo was....then I read your final line.....I didn't recognise you!!

    1. That was a few years ago when I had my long hair and was in the middle of working life. Mr. Swiss worked for a company that did a special journey every year somewhere and wives could go as well. Marrakesh was on the list then. We had all the trimmings, the second best hotel (mamounia was too expensive, so we were in Mansour), and all sorts of adventures. We were even given a 4 wheel jeep to drive into the surrounding mountains. It was quite an thing.

  2. I like all sorts of food too but can't eat chilli. It closes my throat and I am in deep trouble. Even a speck has me choking.